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X UK DOMESTIC DELIVERY:

FINE+RARE offers UK home delivery through our logistics partner London City Bond, with next day deliveries available for Central London addresses.
We deliver Monday to Friday; charges are £ 16 + VAT for up to 10 cases (12x75cl or equivalent) for most UK postcodes.
For delivery charges to Highlands, Islands and outlying areas, please contact our Customer Service Team.

INTERNATIONAL DELIVERY:

For deliveries into Hong Kong and Singapore, we offer a dedicated air and sea service.
For more details regarding delivery to Hong Kong, Singapore and all other destinations, please view our International Delivery information page.
Spirits cannot travel on our services to Hong Kong, Singapore or Macau and require separate shipments. Please contact our Customer Service Team for further information.

F+R STORAGE:

Our storage costs are highly competitive. We will happily accept cases or single bottles, charging pro-rata based on the number of bottles and length of storage period.
Unlike many other wine companies, our service includes storage of duty paid wines as well as in bond from any reputable source, not just those bought through FINE+RARE.
Please visit our F+R Storage information page for more details.

IN BOND AND DUTY PAID DELIVERY TO STORAGE ACCOUNTS:

FINE+RARE can arrange delivery of your wines to your personal fine wine storage account:
Deliveries within London City Bond or to a Vinotheque storage account are charged at £ 8 + VAT for up to 10 cases (12x75cl or equivalent).
Deliveries to all other storage providers are charged at £ 16 + VAT for up to 10 cases (12x75cl or equivalent).

Please contact our Customer Service Team if you have any questions.

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+44(0)2070897400

 

HK CALL:
+852 2832 9986

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Average rating 88.0

An ultra fresh and very pinot nose is nuanced by hints of Gevrey-style earth and a hint of forest floor that also is reflected by the cool, detailed and pliant middle weight flavors that possess good depth but also a mildly edgy finish where it's not entirely clear that it will round out. Allen Meadows, Burghound Jan30,2010
Rousseau’s 2008 Charmes-Chambertin – as usual, two-thirds of it from Mazoyeres – represents (also as usual) the slightly weak link in their collection. Cinnamon tinged fresh red cherry in the nose leads to a refreshing but tart and rather spare palate, with notes from barrel (even though these are one year old, not new) laid alongside rather than integrated with the red fruits. Touches of salt and chalk inform the satisfyingly juicy though not at all rich finish. Perhaps this will integrate or even fatten a bit before bottling, but I don’t fancy it being a wine to hold for more than 6-8 years. Eric Rousseau did not begin harvesting until September 28, but was finished already on October 4, with – as usual – the entire burden of selection placed on his pickers. The resultant wines prove that, as he puts it “they know what they’re doing” and sorting tables are unnecessary. Grapes came in between around 12% and 13.2%, were virtually all destemmed, and were only lightly chaptalized. Levels of malic acid were however higher even than in 2004, reports Rousseau, who compares the fruit with that of 1996, but does not finger the wines as strong candidates for long-term aging (“long term” – bear in mind – meaning upwards of 20 years in the context of a Rousseau track-record). When I tasted his 2008s in late February, Rousseau was planning to bottle them in March or April, a bit earlier than usual, although several struck me as relatively unformed. But then, his malos had finished by July – not late in terms of the vintage. (Unfortunately, I had only one chance to taste Rousseau 2007s: fleetingly, selectively, at a stage too early to merit reporting on in detail, although the trend was promising and Rousseau is keen on the results.) David Schildknecht, Wine Advocate # 189
Rousseau’s 2008 Charmes-Chambertin – as usual, two-thirds of it from Mazoyeres – represents (also as usual) the slightly weak link in their collection. Cinnamon tinged fresh red cherry in the nose leads to a refreshing but tart and rather spare palate, with notes from barrel (even though these are one year old, not new) laid alongside rather than integrated with the red fruits. Touches of salt and chalk inform the satisfyingly juicy though not at all rich finish. Perhaps this will integrate or even fatten a bit before bottling, but I don’t fancy it being a wine to hold for more than 6-8 years. ||Eric Rousseau did not begin harvesting until September 28, but was finished already on October 4, with – as usual – the entire burden of selection placed on his pickers. The resultant wines prove that, as he puts it “they know what they’re doing” and sorting tables are unnecessary. Grapes came in between around 12% and 13.2%, were virtually all destemmed, and were only lightly chaptalized. Levels of malic acid were however higher even than in 2004, reports Rousseau, who compares the fruit with that of 1996, but does not finger the wines as strong candidates for long-term aging (“long term” – bear in mind – meaning upwards of 20 years in the context of a Rousseau track-record). When I tasted his 2008s in late February, Rousseau was planning to bottle them in March or April, a bit earlier than usual, although several struck me as relatively unformed. But then, his malos had finished by July – not late in terms of the vintage. (Unfortunately, I had only one chance to taste Rousseau 2007s: fleetingly, selectively, at a stage too early to merit reporting on in detail, although the trend was promising and Rousseau is keen on the results.) Wine Advocate.June, 2010

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